Presented By: Nick Amaral

Keywords: Gamification, K-12, Problem-Based Learning

Students spend countless hours playing video games. What if we could make school just as engaging? Gamification is taking the video game mechanics kids love and implementing them in the classroom. You don’t have to be a gamer to turn your class into a video game, but if you want to better engage and motivate your students you owe it to them to come check out this session.

In this lecture, you will learn about what Gamification is, what it is not, why it works, and the steps you can take to implement it in your classroom.

Participants will be able to take away a host of things they can immediately implement into their classroom (Terminology, Achievements, Item Shop) to get more out of their kids as well as some long term goals to aim for (Total Points Grading, Mastery Learning, Narrative) for the ultimate Gamified Classroom!

Categories: Concurrent

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Related Posts

Concurrent

The Social Network of Early English Drama: A Digital Humanities Lesson Plan

By Adam Rzepka The Folger Shakespeare Library’s recently launched Digital Anthology of Early Modern English Drama (DA) provides searchable, encoded, digital editions of 403 English plays first staged in London between1576 and 1642. A central Read more…

Concurrent

Innovative Project Based Teaching and Learning Experiences Infusing Literacy

By Jennifer Pankowski and Sharon Medow This collaborative presentation will highlight projects infused in undergraduate and graduate education courses centered in the area of literacy and blended with the humanities, the arts and technology. These projects Read more…

Concurrent

Keeping the Focus on Quality in the Digital Learning Environment

By Jennifer Mathes In 2011, the Online Learning Consortium, known for the Five Pillars for Quality Online Education, introduced the Quality Scorecard for the Administration of Online Programs to support institutions looking for a research-based Read more…